D Magazine

Cry Havoc Theater Company Invites You to the Table

Cry Havoc Theater Company Invites You to the Table

The latest work from Cry Havoc Theater Company opened on January 11. Since 2014, the youth theater company has created work around themes of social justice. Last year, they received the National Community Impact Award from Theatre for Young Audiences/USA.

In Babel, Students Hear from All Sides of Gun Debate

In Babel, Students Hear from All Sides of Gun Debate

The new play from the high school performers of Cry Havoc Theater is informed by dozens of hours of conversations on our gun violence epidemic.

Like many people across the country, high school students are talking about guns. And Cry Havoc, a Dallas theater company made up of youth actors and adult advisers, is listening.

Babel, the company’s new play about gun violence, is drawn from dozens of hours of interviews with gun supporters, gun control advocates, elected officials, and the parents of children lost in school shootings.

The three-hour production, which wraps up its run this weekend at the Winspear’s Hamon Hall, comes a year and a half after Cry Havoc gained national attention for Shots Fired, a documentary-style theater piece about the fatal shooting of five Dallas police officers in July 2016. This time around, Cry Havoc worked in conjunction with AT&T Performing Art’s Center’s Elevator Project, an initiative that platforms art and artists too often left out of the mainstream.

A Dallas Theater Company Needs Your Shoes To Honor Victims of Gun Violence

A Dallas Theater Company Needs Your Shoes To Honor Victims of Gun Violence

Teens with Cry Havoc Theater Company spent their spring break on the East Coast with mothers whose children were killed at school, friends who survived, and politicians at a juncture when it comes to guns. Hady Mawajdeh of KERA traveled with the group. They’re devising a play called Babel based on the interviews they conducted. It’s set to open July 6— a day before the second anniversary of the shootings of Dallas police officers downtown— as part of the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s season of the Elevator Project.

A Dallas Theater Company Needs Your Shoes To Honor Victims of Gun Violence

A Dallas Theater Company Needs Your Shoes To Honor Victims of Gun Violence

Cry Havoc is putting together a large-scale installation to preface Babel, a play based on interviews with people closest to recent shootings.

Teens with Cry Havoc Theater Company spent their spring break on the East Coast with mothers whose children were killed at school, friends who survived, and politicians at a juncture when it comes to guns. Hady Mawajdeh of KERA traveled with the group. They’re devising a play called Babel based on the interviews they conducted. It’s set to open July 6— a day before the second anniversary of the shootings of Dallas police officers downtown— as part of the AT&T Performing Arts Center’s season of the Elevator Project.

Words aren’t all Cry Havoc is collecting. Founder and director Mara Richards Bim sends word about a public art installation they’ll use to express how many lives will be lost to gun violence between January 1 of this year and the night of the play’s opening. Pairs of shoes will represent each person who died, or who dies, in the piece, titled The Cenotaph. Richards says this idea came from the shoes on display at the end of a walk through the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The people who wore them died at concentration camps, and the shoes were taken from the sites of their deaths. The installation is the only one at the museum that visitors can smell, a museum volunteer quoted in this Washington Post piece noted, describing the fumes.